Meet Corey

 

For those who don’t already know, the goals for City Wide Facility Solutions extend beyond offering the best solutions for facility care. One of the pillars City Wide was built upon was the idea of making an impact in our communities. The ripple effect that occurs when we spread positivity and generosity can be felt everywhere our employees do good deeds. Every one of our employees has contributed towards the betterment of our society, and we would like to highlight one employee who has a great message to share.

Corey Wheeler, a Facility Solutions Manager in Kansas City, is a dedicated employee, loyal friend, and loving father. While being good at his job, he is also kind and respectful, upholding our core values. For twenty years, Corey had been experiencing heart rhythm issues that gradually got more and more pronounced. Talking about his condition, Corey stated, “It started pretty mildly… you never realize how serious something is until it gradually gets worse and worse over the years. Even something as simple as climbing a flight of stairs left me out of breath and lightheaded.”

In 2017, Corey was hospitalized for heart arrhythmia. Doctors told Corey he was ineligible for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), meaning heart transplantation was his only hope to get better.

The decision to join the organ recipient list was simple for Corey. “It was a no-brainer for me… of course I want to see my kids continue to grow up and live their lives; there is so much more for me to see in this life that of course, I would say yes to the transplant.”

The process of receiving an organ is not as simple. One hundred thousand people are on the transplant list in the United States and there are many factors that determine eligibility. Lifestyle, diet, timing, and location all play a part in the transplant panel assessing a patient’s status. On top of that, an organ would need to become available. The length of Corey’s life hung in the balance of receiving an organ donor match.

In April of 2021, Corey’s symptoms became so pronounced he admitted himself to the hospital again. “The doctors were shocked that I was even able to drive myself in the condition I was in,” he said. Shortly thereafter, he received the call he had been waiting for, a healthy heart had become available. “I bawled my eyes out after getting that call… it hit me that this was my ticket for my kids to see their dad as they got older,” he said.

“If my story can reach several people, and at least change one person’s mind to become an organ donor, that is between one to eight lives saved.”

The surgery went on as scheduled and was successful. After ten days of recovery and months of outpatient rehab, Corey is back at work and would like to share his message. “Thanks to my donor, I have more time to spend on this earth. If my story can reach several people, and at least change one person’s mind to become an organ donor, that is between one to eight lives saved.” One organ donor can provide eight vital organs (depending on viability) to those in need.

Please Consider Becoming an Organ Donor 

Corey is able to enjoy the love of his family and friends thanks to the grateful foresight one individual had to become an organ donor. Corey’s mission is to let everyone know there is still a need for more organ donors. In the United States, seventeen people die every day waiting for their organ donor match. Sixty-five percent of the population is registered as organ donors although the approval rate of donation is ninety percent.

In the United States, seventeen people die every day waiting for their organ donor match.

Are you an organ donor? Check your driver’s license for the Donor emblem. If you are not currently on the donor list, but would like register, please sign up at organdonor.gov. Or, next time you are at the DMV, let them know you would like to be an organ donor. Thank you to Corey for sharing his story and driving awareness about organ donation. If you are an organ donor, thank you! If you are not, there is still time – thank you so much for your consideration, your decision can save lives.

Organdonor.gov

 

 

 

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